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Globesity: Fat’s New Frontier
August 3, 2014
0

Obesity is no longer just a rich country’s problem. It’s now taken hold in poor and emerging countries and is rapidly developing into an insurmountable health crisis. Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers are on the march in nation’s ill equipped to treat sufferers or educate others about the dangers of getting too fat. It’s predicted that by 2030 one billion people will be obese, so how will the world cope with its ever expanding waistline?

So You Want to Stop… Blowing Off the Gym
August 3, 2014
0

by Coach Stevo

stop-blowing-off-gymEvery month, I go to gyms and offices and give workshops on habit-formation and goal setting. At one of these sessions, a woman raised her hand and said, “I should work out, but I just can’t seem to do it. What should I do?” The tips I offered in my response helped her make a habit out of going to the gym—and I know they can help you, too.

1. Find a closer gym Jennifer Gay, Ph.D., and her colleagues conducted an experiment and found no matter how motivated people were, the biggest factor in determining whether or not people who just started exercising would still be exercising in 6 months was how convenient it was to get to their gym. Why fight an uphill battle? Pick the one that’s closest to your home or office.

2. Go in the morning People who start an exercise habit in the morning are far more likely to stick to it. There are lots of reasons for this, but the most compelling is known as “decision fatigue.” Researchers have found that decisions “cost something” to make and we are more likely to depend on impulse and habit by the end of the day. So after commuting, working, and commuting again, you’re less likely to go the gym later in the day than in the morning.

3. Get beyond “should” There are lots of things we “should” do. We should floss twice a day. And call our mothers. But feeling like we should do something—what psychologists call “introjected motivation”—is a very poor quality motivator when compared to feeling like we “must” to do something, or “need” to do something. So tell your friends that if you don’t workout twelve times this month, they can shave your head. Too extreme? Consider using an app that ups the ante, like Gym-Pact, which charges you money if you don’t go to the gym!

4. Find a reason (for today) Write down every reason you can think of for going to the gym. Every answer to the question, “Why?” Keep that list by your bed. When your alarm goes off at 6AM, grab the list and pick the reason that sounds most motivating to you for that day.

5. Simply set the alarm After getting to the root of her issue, setting an alarm clock seemed to be the best solution for the woman at my workshop. She wasn’t confident that she could go to the gym (even once), but she was 100% confident that she could set an alarm for 6:00am. So I asked her to set it right there, on her phone, in front of me. She could do anything she wanted after the alarm went off—I just wanted her to set the alarm. The next day she walked into my gym at 6:30am. “I was up,” she said. “Thought I’d come here.” 80% of life is showing up—and most of us can’t do that without an alarm.

The biggest reason people don’t reach their goals is not a lack of desire, discipline, or even falling off the horse. Not getting back on the horse is the biggest reason people fail.

I can promise each and every one of you, on your journey to your health and fitness goals, you will slip. You will miss a few days at the gym. You might even miss a month, or a year. But even a year won’t matter if you’re able to start again tomorrow.

Raise your hand if you’re guilty of blowing off the gym. Think one of these tips will get you there tomorrow? Let us know in the comments!

Coach Stevo is the nutrition and sport psychology consultant at San Francisco CrossFit. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, holds a BA in Philosophy from the University of Chicago, and is finishing his MA in Applied Sport Psychology at John F. Kennedy University. His specialty is habit-based training and he contributed to Intervention by Dan John in 2012.

Everything You Need to Know about Nutrition and Health
August 3, 2014
0

Eating S.A.N.E and Sugar Addiction
August 3, 2014
0

How to be Insanely Productive Without Destroying Your Health
August 3, 2014
0

 

6 Foods You Should Be Eating More
June 27, 2014
0

myfitnesspal avodado

No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

Sweet Potatoes “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

Avocados Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

Zucchini You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

Corn Tortillas White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

Sliced Whole Fruit There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

Dark Chocolate Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

– See more at: http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2014/06/6-foods-you-should-be-eating-more-of/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jun25newsletter&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonuajKZKXonjHpfsX%2F7OgrUKG3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ASMRnI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrTFMblm0LgLXhM%3D#sthash.JRVcfeHp.dpuf

6 Foods You Should Be Eating More Of

myfitnesspal avodado

No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

Sweet Potatoes “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

Avocados Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

Zucchini You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

Corn Tortillas White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

Sliced Whole Fruit There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

Dark Chocolate Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

– See more at: http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2014/06/6-foods-you-should-be-eating-more-of/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jun25newsletter&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonuajKZKXonjHpfsX%2F7OgrUKG3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ASMRnI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrTFMblm0LgLXhM%3D#sthash.JRVcfeHp.dpuf

6 Foods You Should Be Eating More Of

myfitnesspal avodado

No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

Sweet Potatoes “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

Avocados Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

Zucchini You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

Corn Tortillas White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

Sliced Whole Fruit There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

Dark Chocolate Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

– See more at: http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2014/06/6-foods-you-should-be-eating-more-of/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jun25newsletter&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonuajKZKXonjHpfsX%2F7OgrUKG3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ASMRnI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrTFMblm0LgLXhM%3D#sthash.j4dYyOm2.dpuf

6 Foods You Should Be Eating More Of

myfitnesspal avodado

No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

Sweet Potatoes “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

Avocados Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

Zucchini You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

Corn Tortillas White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

Sliced Whole Fruit There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

Dark Chocolate Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

– See more at: http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2014/06/6-foods-you-should-be-eating-more-of/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jun25newsletter&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonuajKZKXonjHpfsX%2F7OgrUKG3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ASMRnI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrTFMblm0LgLXhM%3D#sthash.j4dYyOm2.dpuf

6 Foods You Should Be Eating More Of

myfitnesspal avodado

No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

Sweet Potatoes “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

Avocados Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

Zucchini You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

Corn Tortillas White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

Sliced Whole Fruit There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

Dark Chocolate Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

– See more at: http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/2014/06/6-foods-you-should-be-eating-more-of/?utm_source=mfp&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jun25newsletter&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonuajKZKXonjHpfsX%2F7OgrUKG3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ASMRnI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrTFMblm0LgLXhM%3D#sthash.j4dYyOm2.dpuf

avodado1No one likes to be on high alert when it comes to calories. In a dream world, that huge slice of German chocolate cake would only be around 100 calories, and nutritionists would suggest skipping vegetables in favor of a creamy pasta dish for dinner. Sadly, we don’t live in that world, folks, which means we need to be smart about what we put on our plates.

Annoying, the challenge of making healthy choices can lead to a lot of confusion and questioning at meal time. Who hasn’t experienced the dread of wondering whether or not the bite you’re about to take is “good” or “bad” for your weight loss goal? It can cause you to look at out food options in terms of what you can’t eat. But what if you changed your mindset, and looked instead at what you can eat?

There are tons of delicious foods you should be eating more of—not less! And you might find adding more of the healthy choices to your eating plan, will help you naturally eat less of the processed, sugar-laden, carb-loaded, fatty foods you don’t need. Here, Megan Roosevelt, R.D., L.D., founder of Healthy Grocery Girl, reveals 6 nutrient-dense foods you can load up on.

1. Sweet Potatoes- “Fiber helps us feel full and satisfied, as well as manage blood sugar levels,” says Roosevelt. Consider the vitamin and mineral benefits, including potassium and vitamin C, and you should be opting for treat-like sweet potatoes, more often. You can bake them, mash them, or serve them up as sweet potato fries, just like your classic white potato.

2. Avocados- Avocados are brimming with benefits. “Protein, fat, and fiber are the three key nutrients that help us feel full and satisfied,” says Roosevelt. “Healthy fats in our diet also support the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.” Next time you’re tempted to use sour cream, add a quarter of an avocado to your dish instead. Whipped avocado has a similar texture, but offers more healthy nutrients.

3. Zucchini- You can swap in zucchini as a base for many recipes—from fries to brownies. Roosevelt’s favorite switch is for pasta. “Use a julienne peeler to make noodle-like strips, and you’ve got a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate option that’s also nutritionally dense and contains fiber,” she says.

4. Corn Tortillas- White flour causes your insulin levels to rise, which promotes fat storage. Corn on the other hand contains more fiber, so you’ll stay full after noshing on that veggie wrap or taco. “Fiber delays digestion and regulates the release of glucose from our food into our bloodstream, helping us avoid blood sugar spikes and crashes,” says Roosevelt.

5. Sliced Whole Fruit- There’s no reason not to eat more fruit, says Roosevelt, who again points out that it’s all about fiber—and flavor. “Feeling full after meals and snacks is key for weight loss. If we’re always hungry, it’s hard to lose weight,” she says. Her suggestions: Use fruit slices in sandwiches and wraps instead of jam or jelly (try PB and apple, or almond butter and pear), and toss fruit slices into your water for a hint of flavor that will get you to drink more.

6. Dark Chocolate- Need a sweet treat? Don’t deny yourself now, only to binge later. A one-ounce serving of dark chocolate is about 150 calories, and it contains flavanoids that have been shown to improve circulation and heart health, says Roosevelt.

Which of these foods play a starring role in your diet? Tell us in the comments!

Ask Your Friends to Help You Stay Motivated
June 25, 2014
0

Are you trying to reach your summer fitness goals? If so – maybe it’s time to grab a partner. Studies show support from family or friends has frequently been associated with effective long-term weight loss maintenance. ShapeUp® lets you share your progress and invite your friends to support and challenge you.

Stay motivated by asking friends to join you on your ShapeUp® goals.FitBit Together you can kick start your weight loss or take a virtual walk from New York to Boston. With ShapeUp®, you can set health goals, track your progress against those goals, and compete with family, friends, and coworkers. As a member, you can also connect your FitBit directly to ShapeUp®, so logging exercise and steps becomes effortless.

Warning Signes of Type 2 Diabetes
June 16, 2014
0

People with type 2 diabetes frequently have no symptoms. When symptoms do appear, one of the first may be an increase in thirst. This is often accompanied by additional problems, including dry mouth, increased appetite, frequent urination — sometimes as often as every hour — and unusual weight loss or gain.

 

 

Headache

Headaches

As blood sugar levels become more abnormal, additional symptoms may include headaches, blurred vision, and fatigue.

 

 

band-aid_on_thumbInfections

In many cases, type 2 diabetes is not discovered until it takes a noticeable toll on health. One red flag is troubling infections, such as:

  • Cuts or sores that are slow to heal
  • Frequent yeast infections or urinary tract infections
  • Itchy skin, especially in the groin area

 

 

Sobering Facts about Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes
June 16, 2014
0
One out of three people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it.

One out of three people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it.

The CDC just released its 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report (PDF), and the results are alarming: 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and 8.1 million of those are undiagnosed. Type 2 diabetes strikes people of all ages, and early symptoms are subtle. In fact, about one out of three people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it.

This chronic condition thwarts the body’s ability to use the carbohydrates in food for energy. The result is elevated blood sugar. Over time, this excess sugar raises the risk for heart disease, loss of vision, nerve and organ damage, and other serious conditions.

The CDC created two excellent infographics (on diabetes and pre-diabetes) that you should definitely check out. You can view full-size versions them here and here.It really reinforces the need for biometric screenings on at least an annual basis. For many people, it’s the only screening they have all year — and the cost of untreated diabetes can be staggering.
Is Sugar Toxic?
March 30, 2014
1

In 2012, 60 Minutes did a great piece on the dangers of Sugar in our diets. The report suggests that sugar is the most addictive substance on earth. It’s also the most dangerous and toxic substance anyone can consume. Sugar has similar affects on the brain like cocaine. Heart disease, cancer, diabetes type II and many more are contributed to processed sugar.

Take a look – and then share your thoughts!